It is currently Sun Dec 08, 2019 7:29 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 302 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next
 CAD, CAM, CNC etc. 
Author Message

Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2012 3:36 pm
Posts: 408
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Yes, I will finally open my Fusion conversion kit when I move.

My main concern though is insulating the noise, (pesky neighbours) so I've been scanning various forums and youTube to see what people are doing in terms of boxing it up.

Rather than go for something quick and easy, I think I will give it a lot of thought and build the "ultimate" sound proofing box once I research the possibilities.

The best ones seem to consist of several layers with insulating material in between, much like you insulate cavity walls really.

I like perspex because it's easy to clean, and for the door you could use two layers of clear perspex, like double glazing, even a triple layer is necessary, though this won't be as effective as proper gas filled double glazing windows (glass is probably dangerous and too heavy for this purpose)

But no matter how much you insulate the inside of the box, I wonder if the exposed inside layer, for example, caustic foam or similar, has to be completely exposed to be effective in absorbing the noise, or whether it can be covered with perplex on top to make it easy to clean.

Some people use bare carpet for the inside, but what a mess with all that metal flying around!

There's a lot of research I have to do.

Edward


Tue Oct 13, 2015 12:11 pm
Profile

Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 4:50 pm
Posts: 561
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Ed

On the subject of sound prevention. I recently had a problem with noise from a big stepper motor on my crane rig. Normally this is not a problem but this job they wanted to shoot dialogue which couldn't be post synced. I visited the local experts on sound baffling, who do a variety of stuff for industry. Anyway it transpired that the main approach, such as used for silencing big generators, is to build a solid, well damped box with a couple of layers sandwiched with some high density plaster-board, and to line the inside first with a thin layer of dense rubber like material, which acts to dampen any resonances in the box, then a layer of special acoustic foam about 1 to 2 inches thick.

So I bought a sheet of the damping material and the foam and went off to make a box around my motor.

Result? Well hardly any improvement! The problem as it turned out was most of the noise was actually being transmitted through chassis of the dolly, which the motor was firmly bolted to. So the whole dolly was acting like a big speaker and box just happily blocking directly transmitted sound from the motor. I tried desperately to intercede by rubber mounting the motor, but to keep the motor from wobbling, the rubber had to be bolted tightly, and then it stopped acting as an effective sound barrier.

It clearly wasn't practical to box up the whole dolly, and since I didn't have time to build a whole specially designed isolated motor mounting system, so in the end I had to change the motor for a servo and go with that. (Not my preferred option since the servo is very tricky to tune when running a large heavy rig...)

Anyway - long story, but maybe some lessons that might also apply to you? While it might seem logical to stop noise at the source, it can be really hard, hence other options like soundproofing the ceiling and or walls may be worth looking at. Particularly as you will have more than one machine and can't silence them all.

BTW - I don't think using gas in a double glazed window will make any difference to sound transmission. It's normally put there to displace water vapor and prevent condensation. In fact a vacuum would be the most effective barrier, since sounds waves need air or matter to transmit... in space there is no sound... :)

As for the acoustic foam, it will have little or no benefit if you cover it up, it works by dispersing the sounds waves and preventing reflection back inside the box.. If you use it on the ceiling or walls of your workshop it will make the inside a lot quieter! But equally true, you might do without it, if you use a heavily dampened box made of several layers. But your window is always going to be the weakest spot, and you might also get some resonances sneaking through the base like in my case. Though I would hope a heavy machine base is less likely to transmit noise than my dolly.

Ultimately the main purpose for an enclosure is to keep the oil spray and swarf at bay, like D1's perspex barrier.

So consider the other options first?


Wed Oct 14, 2015 4:06 pm
Profile

Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2012 3:36 pm
Posts: 408
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
geraldft wrote:
Hi Ed


If you use it on the ceiling or walls of your workshop it will make the inside a lot quieter! But equally true, you might do without it, if you use a heavily dampened box made of several layers.

So consider the other options first?



Thank you for your thoughts Gerald.

I think insulating the garage is impractical, these garages are flimsy and made up of slabs of concrete, timber door, the roof is a corrugated grey something, probably some form of asbestos, better left undisturbed:)
I thought of knocking down the garage and build a proper side extension, suitably acustically insulated, basically it means adding another room to the side of the house, all in keeping. But that's so expensive in London!

So the other option is, as you say, a layered box, maybe using acustic plasterboard and other suitable material in between layers is probably easier.

The lathe is actually very quiet, unless you use it at night, but it's much quieter than your typical washing machine. So no need to insulate it.

The mill is relatively quiet, as it's belt driven, max revs are 2500, and the pitch is low, unlike routers that run at 20k revs and have that shrill noise. It's kind of a mickey mouse mill, but it works if not pushed too hard, as D1 can testify.

I thought of using these vibration dampening rubber legs (vibration dampers), which screw to the base of the mill on one side and to the table on the other, but the bolt is separated inside the rubber, so there is no metal transmission through the solid rubber damper. There are also some specialist matts as used by machinery workshops, and even for washing machines. This may help with the base. The rest is just the layered box. Kind of a nice little project for when times are quieter. All this talk of CNC machines has incentivised me.

Edward

PS. Servos are your best friend:)


Thu Oct 15, 2015 5:39 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
I would still be tempted to go the kingspan route http://www.buildingmaterials.co.uk/king ... oCF5Pw_wcB

If you get it thick enough its self supporting so you could build a shed within your shed . It can be held together with something as simple as metal barbi skewers. Great insulation both acoustic and thermal two birds killed with one stone . I like killings as may birds with least stones :D
D1


Thu Oct 15, 2015 6:33 am
Profile

Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2012 3:36 pm
Posts: 408
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
DISPLACEMENT 1 wrote:
I would still be tempted to go the kingspan route http://www.buildingmaterials.co.uk/king ... oCF5Pw_wcB

If you get it thick enough its self supporting so you could build a shed within your shed . It can be held together with something as simple as metal barbi skewers. Great insulation both acoustic and thermal two birds killed with one stone . I like killings as may birds with least stones :D
D1



Now you are tempting me...

What would you do for the door? The front garage double doors are not a problem as they could be insulated (semi-blocked) , as I would only use the back door for entry, a normal size door that opens outwards.

Then putting up a dummy suspended ceiling is quite an undertaking. I'll ask my friendly Kiwi handyman, see if he can do something...

Ed


Thu Oct 15, 2015 7:13 am
Profile

Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 4:50 pm
Posts: 561
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
If the back door is big enough to get gear in and out, then I'd ditch the main doors and insert a panelled wall with windows, that would make it a lot more pleasant without needing to completely rebuild? And if you insulate everything it should reduce sound transfer anyway...

PS - been using the 2 axis DRO and it is brilliant. You can dial in a center and radius and drill a circular pattern of perfect holes in a minute...

G


Fri Oct 16, 2015 7:08 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Well going off topic again but at least we in the off topic section and i do like shed talk :D
If it was me i would get rid of the garage doors and replace them with standard cheap patio doors . These include good locks and sealed units so good thermal sound characteristics .
What my shed as and built that meself :D
[flickr]Image2013-07-10 19.18.59 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]
D1


Sat Oct 17, 2015 7:43 am
Profile

Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2012 3:36 pm
Posts: 408
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
D1, you are too humble, that looks too grand for a shed!

I couldn't put patio doors on the front, I would have the council officers arrest me instantly for bringing my area into disrepute! There are lots of building regulations.

To give you an idea, I had air con installed recently, and you could just see a tiny little corner of the outside air-con unit from the street outside, as it was mounted low on the side of the house. The council objected (some neighbour complained) and I had to move the unit to the back of the house, completely out of sight from anywhere in the street.

So the original front doors must stay, but there's nothing to stop me from blocking the doors with insulation on the inside. And for the back door, yes, a doubler triple glazed patio type door would be perfectly ok.


Edward


Sat Oct 17, 2015 11:42 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:55 am
Posts: 951
Location: UK
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
All this talk of insulation etc, must start up the wood burner and make sure it is in good order for colder months ahead. My shed was once a three storey dwelling and will probably revert back one day, only top floor heated but basement maintains a fairly stable 15C and the middle bit gets heat from a large lean-to that could probably heat the lot with a bit of ingenuity. Sorry about your neighbours Edward, good ones are worth their weight in gold, mine are either deaf or too far away to worry ;) Maybe this is the time to carry out some Ali smelting experiments and warm your workshop.

_________________
Smile, it gives your face something to do!

http://www.vimeo.com/user1214873/videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrReggub


Mon Oct 19, 2015 6:34 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Mike you back then . Your shed sounds interesting 3 floors great :D .
On the Ali smelting front slowly collecting bits but have made this .
[flickr]Image2015-10-19 19.19.20 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]
[flickr]Image2015-10-19 19.00.06 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]
Vac chamber/ de gasser old fridge compressor again ! Its a crime these things get junked all the time . Achieves 1 bar vacuum and that's as high as gauge goes so good enough
D1


Mon Oct 19, 2015 11:58 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 11, 2009 10:45 am
Posts: 1685
Location: Merritt Island, Florida, Estates Unitas
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Sorry to hear about Ed's neighbors. Mine are afraid of me, so no problems.

Nice vacuum chamber. Mine is similar, using a big cooking pot as a slightly larger chamber. Same thick plexi lid with gauge. I use mine for casting plastic parts in a vacuum to avoid air bubbles marring the parts.


Tue Oct 20, 2015 6:11 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:55 am
Posts: 951
Location: UK
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi, D1, back, lawns cut and a few other jobs started, no time to finish slew bearing yet ;)
Neat looking set up, see quite a few old fridges at the recycling depot but no chance to obtain one. I am guessing the two figures in the background are representative of what comes out of the pot ?

_________________
Smile, it gives your face something to do!

http://www.vimeo.com/user1214873/videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrReggub


Tue Oct 20, 2015 6:19 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
I cry every time i go to the dump :( lots of fridges lpg bottles etc we do waste a lot of stuff .
My two angels they watch over me ! old sculpt from me fire and ice vid long time ago
D1


Tue Oct 20, 2015 8:20 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:38 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Exmouth, Western Australia
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
What an interesting week! While I was already in Perth looking after my mother-in-law as she went to some routine medical appointments, my wife got a ride down from Exmouth with the Royal Flying Doctor Service after being diagnosed with appendicitis! At least we were all going in and out of the same hospital.
All home safe and sound now.

D1,
That's a very stylish shed door. I must clean the windows in mine and take a picture. Here the problem is keeping the heat out so we have a big sheet of shadecloth over the roof to keep the sun off and no less than two air conditioners to keep it cool inside.

Any advice on using a fridge compressor? Things not to do when cutting one free of an old fridge at the tip?

Kit


Wed Oct 21, 2015 6:12 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Kit sorry to here about your medical wows .
I crimp the tubes with the pliers before i cut this should stop the gas leaking. Can you just wander round tips in Australia :D .
A thing to note with fridge compressors is they have a two stage starting system. Which in some cases means you cant instantly re start them . I thought i had broken my first one but you have to give it a minute or so to cool down and it will restart.
Have you done anymore ali casting ?
D1


Wed Oct 21, 2015 11:32 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:38 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Exmouth, Western Australia
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
In theory you need a license to take stuff off the tip, but there's only one person on duty here normally so...

Do you just let the gas escape from the compressor while nobody's looking?

I've done some work on upgrading the furnace for melting copper to make 'Aluminium Bronze' but we now have an official, total fire ban for the next six months or so to avoid anybody starting a bush fire during the dry summer months. It's just not worth the risk of getting caught (big fine) or actually setting your neighbors house on fire (big fine, jail term, uninsured damages claim) so there won't be much happening on that front for a while.

Al Bronze looks quite promising as a material. 10% Al and 90% Cu by weight (that's about 1/3 Al by volume). Apparently it machines well, casts well and is very tough. They make propellers for the worlds biggest ships out of it. The components are easy to get hold of too. High purity Cu and Al are what you get from offcuts of underground electrical distribution cables if you know who to talk to.

I have bought some of the bits I was planning to cast for my CNC router so there's some progress there. Motor mounts are coming on, I just need to sort out some minimum-backlash doo-daahs to connect onto the threaded rod drives. It's time to find out how well my stock of HDPE (chopped up milk bottles) will melt into workable chunks. Either that or nuts bedded in epoxy just to get the thing moving.

Kit


Thu Oct 22, 2015 4:51 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 16, 2013 4:07 am
Posts: 306
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
years ago you could help yourself at the tip now its a valuable resource ;) ah kit i think your confusing wallet with license lol you only need a wallet with some money in it. i do suspect whoever owns endevour workshops is onto a nice little money earner however. over here in qld its endevour that has all the tip rights tied up not sure who it is in wa. i have a friend that repairs fridges so he usually reclaims the gases from tip fridges he also does the same for lpg cylinders that get dumped thus rendering them safe (safe being a relative term) then uses that same lpg to power his car. more environmentally friendly then just releasing the gas into the air i guess :lol: i'm not sure if he is compensated for the service he renders or not
that chopped up milk bottles sounds interesting kit you have a website to visit on that sort of stuff? we are big on milk here so have lots of plastic bottles that could be put to some use besides growing seedlings


Fri Oct 23, 2015 11:50 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:55 am
Posts: 951
Location: UK
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Plant pot furnace:

_________________
Smile, it gives your face something to do!

http://www.vimeo.com/user1214873/videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrReggub


Sat Oct 24, 2015 12:54 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Mike i have all the bits for a variation on this burner so that's me starting point . Just need to get myself a full tank of propane and a regulator . The furnace is going to be a garden feature so don't have to worry to much about blow out protection etc .

D1


Sat Oct 24, 2015 10:57 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:55 am
Posts: 951
Location: UK
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Probably got all the makings for that in my cellar, 40-50 yrs of accumulated gas and water fittings :D Not that I am in any hurry to make a melting pot.
Interesting video.

_________________
Smile, it gives your face something to do!

http://www.vimeo.com/user1214873/videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrReggub


Sat Oct 24, 2015 11:46 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:38 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Exmouth, Western Australia
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Chardie,
I don't know what happens in the metropolis, but way out here the tip is run by the local Shire.
I haven't tried melting the plastic yet, you need to control the temperature and be able to compress the hot goo into a former, but I am having some success with the nuts-in-epoxy method for constructing leadscrews. This nicely avoids any accurate machining which I can't do until I've finished the machine!

Mike, D1,
There are plenty of designs for simple furnaces about, many of which are a bit too simple. You need good insulation to keep the heat in, especially if you plan to burn expensive Propane gas. Colin Peck 'The Artful Bodger' has a design for a furnace which burns old engine oil. His design has no problem melting iron and he makes his own iron crucibles for melting other metals. He has a book out with the designs in it. If you're serious about doing your own casting I recommend it. Link below...

http://www.artfulbodgermetalcasting.com/

Kit


Sun Oct 25, 2015 3:22 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:55 am
Posts: 951
Location: UK
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hope all is now well on the hospital front Kit.
Shooting stick casting:
My first and last casting project. I still remember knocking it out of the sand box , cleaning it up on a lathe and polishing it with emery cloth and a buffing wheel even after 50+ years. Funny I found this but still cannot find the gear I milled a few months ago :oops:


Attachments:
Casting.jpg
Casting.jpg [ 47.92 KiB | Viewed 12369 times ]

_________________
Smile, it gives your face something to do!

http://www.vimeo.com/user1214873/videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrReggub
Mon Oct 26, 2015 8:10 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:38 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Exmouth, Western Australia
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Mike,
I now have a fit and healthy wife again. We're both very pleased about that! Thank you for asking.

Kit


Sun Nov 08, 2015 8:02 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:55 am
Posts: 951
Location: UK
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Another maybe useful link, found indirectly in another post on water cutting gears.
http://lcamtuf.coredump.cx/gcnc/

Currently machining a low profile vice, sunny weather stopped work in favour of never ending garden chores.

_________________
Smile, it gives your face something to do!

http://www.vimeo.com/user1214873/videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrReggub


Tue Nov 24, 2015 1:17 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Not really CAD or CAM but thought people may be interested specially Kit if you get a 3D printer and want make puppets .
Sculptris http://pixologic.com/sculptris/ from the makers of ZBrush its free and very easy to use . Its especially good at organic shapes and people seem to spend most of their time making mythical monsters . Some people should get out more :D .
Its a lot better than the free form sculpting in Blender but not so good if you want to do geometric stuff . But the good news is you can sculpt in Sculptris and import into Blender with no great problems .
Give it a go its fun and its free you never know their may be a Michelangelo lurking in you

D1


Tue Nov 24, 2015 2:17 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:38 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Exmouth, Western Australia
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
D1,

That does look interesting. I've been trying out sculpting in Hebel (foamed concrete) this week. It's kinda fun but the mess if you try roughing it out with an angle grinder is horrendous!

The greater achievement is a working 'Mark Zero' CNC router! As I've said before the real problem with building a CNC router is that it would really help if you already have a CNC router before you begin. The design philosophy of the Mark 0 is to be that router. It's primary purpose is to make the parts needed for it's own first rebuild, hence the total lack of aesthetic considerations. I also wanted to prove I could get something up and running before committing too much loot to the project.
As the video shows, it does actually work. There are some issues with rigidity in the Z-axis, but I'm hoping that a slower plunge speed and smaller cut depth will allow me sufficient accuracy to make the frames needed to rebuild this part of the machine first.

I've already ordered some of the upgrade mechanicals, such as acme lead screws to replace the galvanised threaded rods currently in use.

The video isn't that exciting but I am especially proud of the DIY stepper driver shown at the end.



Thu Nov 26, 2015 6:22 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:55 am
Posts: 951
Location: UK
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Looking good Kit and remember every precision machine had a starting point :-) I hope to finish machining the low profile vice base by the weekend, depends if it rains or not otherwise its the garden, big clearance project in progress.
Are you using CamBam to control the cutter or was that my imagination?

_________________
Smile, it gives your face something to do!

http://www.vimeo.com/user1214873/videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrReggub


Thu Nov 26, 2015 7:19 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:38 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Exmouth, Western Australia
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Mike,
Thanks for the kind words. I'm using CamBam on my W10 laptop to design the pieces but the driving software is LinuxCNC. I have a dedicated PC for the router which gives nice low latency figures. Everything works together very well, I have had no problems setting up LinuxCNC to drive the hardware correctly and CamBam G-code runs perfectly on it. The only tiny hiccup I had was that LinuxCNC doesn't list G-code files with the .nc file extension from CamBam when you ask it to open a file. You have to select 'Files of all types' to be able to see these files but, once loaded, they execute perfectly.

The main problem is the Z-axis which tilts back a little when it hits the material. The first upgrade will use two tracks to overcome this.

Kit


Thu Nov 26, 2015 4:31 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:55 am
Posts: 951
Location: UK
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
I have CamBam (D1 recommendation) and did not think I had seen an option to control hardware. I find it quite a powerful and easy (for me) programme to use.

I have not tried it but you may be able change the file extension. Highlight the Machining header in the hierarchy tree and change the "Out file" extension in the Basic / Advanced options from .nc to the extension you require.

_________________
Smile, it gives your face something to do!

http://www.vimeo.com/user1214873/videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrReggub


Fri Nov 27, 2015 1:52 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi kit good start on the CNC you wont regret the time spent on it . Loads of uses great for making PCBs for example loads of software out their . You may want to think about having a 3D printer attachment to . Maybe consider this on the next iteration just give yourself a bit more travel on the Z axis. Then bung a extruder on the end thats what i did :D .
Hi Mike glad you like CamBam are you building a machine vice from scratch ?
D1


Fri Nov 27, 2015 11:13 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:55 am
Posts: 951
Location: UK
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
DISPLACEMENT 1 wrote:
Hi kit good start on the CNC you wont regret the time spent on it . Loads of uses great for making PCBs for example loads of software out their . You may want to think about having a 3D printer attachment to . Maybe consider this on the next iteration just give yourself a bit more travel on the Z axis. Then bung a extruder on the end thats what i did :D .
Hi Mike glad you like CamBam are you building a machine vice from scratch ?
D1


Hi, D1, the vice base is in progress using 15mm Ali plate, jaws will also be Ali and will both be movable. The base has dowel pin holes set at 25mm spacing to precisely locate the jaws and reduce the clamping screw movement, they will be secured to the base by cap screws.
The rear jaw will sit on the base plate or I can design another to overhang the back of the base to clamp longer pieces of work.
I plan to make the jaws soft / hard and will use ground strips of hardened steel inserts (hacksaw blades).
I need it to be low profile, >38mm high, to utilise the total Y axis mill travel that is restricted by the Z axis lead screw if it is any higher.
The base also has location lugs on the bottom of the base that locate in the T-slots of the table to reduce the need to trammel every time I use it.
Next I will finish the slew bearing I have been working on in between gardening project and another trip South soon to find some winter sun ;)
How is your Techo crane coming along or is that still in design stage?

_________________
Smile, it gives your face something to do!

http://www.vimeo.com/user1214873/videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrReggub


Fri Nov 27, 2015 1:01 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:38 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Exmouth, Western Australia
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
D1,
That's good advice about extending the Z axis to make room for a 3D print extruder. I'll take that into account while I'm deciding the best way to make the Z axis more rigid.

I'd also be grateful for some advice on cutting MDF. My current end-mill is showing signs of overheating but I obviously can't throw coolant around a porous material.

Kit


Fri Nov 27, 2015 5:18 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Mike your vice sounds a nice little project in itself . Post pics when its done must admit the one i use is a bit big and cumbersome but it was cheap :D
Hi kit i tend to avoid MDF over the years i have prob inhaled far to much :( . I love machining acrylic its almost self lubricating and i have a ready free supply of what tends to be 5mm and 2mm . I have found some machines better than others though and not sure why . Some types tend to melt and clog the bit .
But if you are stuck with MDF you prob best not using a end mill . When i have used pro CNC routers the bit tends to be a more spiral affair i have some old one someware . Will try and find them and post a pic
Heres a vid of CNC router with extruder on it you may as well try and fit one in i wont cost much more .

and this one

D1


Sat Nov 28, 2015 3:20 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Me again ! Found some router cutters Kit see pic
[flickr]Image2015-11-28 13.40.29 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]
You may want to try slowing your spindle down or increasing feed rate . When i do mill MDF i cut quite fast and my mill hasn't got the speediest of spindles.
I have also found nylon chopping boards machine great . Tough cheap etc . i get mine from Ikea of course you my struggle to find one of these in the Australian outback http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/90202268/
D1


Sat Nov 28, 2015 6:45 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:38 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Exmouth, Western Australia
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
D1,
Thanks for showing those. I've got some 1/8 bits that look similar to one of those pictures that I bought for my Dremmel. I'm still waiting for a 1/8 collet adapter for the 1/4" makita router before i can try them on this rig. The end mill I've been testing is a 4 flute type which may well not be optimum. I've ordered a couple of other cheap Chinese options to see what works.

The router came with a single straight flute bit, but I'm not sure that can plunge into the material like an end mill.

On the software front, I really like CamBam's simplicity but I would like the option of assembling the different components to see how they fit together. I've looked at quite a list of possibilities but finding a smooth route from importing a DXF of the track extrusion to outputting G-code via easy modeling and assembly of all the parts has proved difficult. DesignSpark mechanical looked good but has very limited import/export options (which don't include DXF) and lacks some basic functions such as the ability to mirror lines and objects.

Fusion 360 on the other hand just works from beginning to end including outputting G-code which LinuxCNC is happy with. This takes us right back up to the top of this thread and I'll just have to put up with the limitations of the heavy cloud dependance of the software.

I'm jealous of you and Mike with your swanky milling machines, but I don't have room for such an immovable installation, nor will my wife tolerate anything that creates dust and noise in our shared studio. The current router and it's compute can be carried out to a table on the patio when it needs to be fired up. Mustn't let it get much heavier!


Sun Nov 29, 2015 5:13 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Kit think you will find you can mirror objects line etc in designspark . Wouldn't want to to put people off it but each to his own of course. It exports DXF fine to CamBam and for importing i just tend to use the extensive cad library http://www.tracepartsonline.net/(S(idol ... btwl02pxgk))/content.aspx?home=1&class=TRACE . Plenty of extrusion profile in their :D
D1


Sun Nov 29, 2015 12:12 pm
Profile

Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 4:50 pm
Posts: 561
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Kit. I've been playing with Fusion 360 and it's not bad. The biggest problem with CAD and 3D programs is interchanging file formats - so if you can do it all in one program, it saves a lot of time futzing with files. The cloud thing is only a hassle when it spends time updating stuff, but it works offline as well.


Sun Nov 29, 2015 4:01 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:38 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Exmouth, Western Australia
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
I've spent many a long hour over the last week or so getting to grips with Fusion 360. Having no previous CAD experience it's been a bit frustrating, but I'm beginning to get the hang of Sketches, Bodies, Components and Assemblies and how important it is to have all the right bits collected together or separated, as required.
This isn't so easy when you're making it up as you go along and with this software being in a rather fluid state at the moment, there isn't a "Learn CAD with Fusion 360" book available yet. Most of the tutorials assume you know all of this stuff.

Anyway, most of the bits for the first upgrade have just arrived so the incentive is on to get the design in 360 to the point where I can cut out the new lumps of MDF required.

I've also got a single Leadshine stepper driver so I can compare the performance with the HQ6600 based ones I'm using at the moment.

Kit


Tue Dec 08, 2015 10:27 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:18 pm
Posts: 1294
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Finally got my skip rescued laser cutter up and running . Was slightly nervous about ordering the new tube from China . Only real option but turned out OK only took four days to arrive . Cost close to £500 so you can see why i was worried .
Anyways all fitted now had to make a few changes as its now a 60 watt tube so bit longer .Can you guess which bit i had to make :D
[flickr]Image2015-12-11 17.25.04 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]
Also no software so all runs from CamBam now running through Mach3 . You can get a special post processor for Cambam that outputs suitable G code to drive the laser cutter .
Still a bit of tweaking to do but first cut of a 120 teeth HTD3 pulley turned out well . Meshes perfectly with the belt so the pulley will eventually bolt onto my slew bearings Yeah !
[flickr]Image2015-12-11 18.05.52 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]
[flickr]Image2015-12-11 18.06.19 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]
[flickr]Image2015-12-11 18.06.40 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]
D1


Fri Dec 11, 2015 11:29 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:38 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Exmouth, Western Australia
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
D1,
Maybe the cost of the tube explains why the machine was in a skip in the first place? You must be relieved to have it all working, that pulley looks really good.
I can see a nice little business here making bespoke parts from Timescape readers own CamBam files. How much is postage to Australia :D

On the home front, My machine has had all it's nuts and bolts tightened up to take out as much play as possible. There is still some rotation of the cutter about the x-axis rail as it plunges into the material but I'm hoping a narrower cutter (my 6-3mm collet adapter arrived yesterday) and slow plunge speed will make it accurate enough to start making parts for the upgrade. My Fusion 360 skills are improving to the point where I hope to have some finished designs in a few days time.

Kit


Fri Dec 11, 2015 3:24 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 302 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forums/DivisionCore. pozycjonowanie