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 CAD, CAM, CNC etc. 
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Joined: Wed Oct 16, 2013 4:07 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
er... route out a guitar perhaps ;)


Wed Feb 10, 2016 4:20 am
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Location: Exmouth, Western Australia
Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
chardie wrote:
er... route out a guitar perhaps ;)

Oh I've thought of that one as well. It's over 40 years since the first time I took a soldering iron to the insides of an electric guitar and the idea of building one from scratch has always been attractive. Brian May didn't do too bad a job of it. I just wish I could play the ones I already have. Perhaps I should practice more than once in a blue moon.

Kit


Wed Feb 10, 2016 5:21 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
It would have to be a mini guitar on my router Chardie. There are enough guitars on the wall as it is. Just right now !

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Wed Feb 10, 2016 2:25 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Well motor just gone on my mill :( Its had a hard life though so cant complain i suppose . Remember a couple of years ago the spindle motor on the CNC router went at one places i work and that was only about a year old . Dont think these things last long generally !
Was considering upgrading my mill to a spindle motor https://www.cnc4you.co.uk/Spindle/Spind ... tching-VFD but think i will stick with the standard motor it was nice and quite .
In the long term i will build a CNC router which can do ali. A bigger bed would be very handy i do find the small table on my mill very limiting .
D1


Thu Feb 18, 2016 2:35 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Do you have a 3040 or 6040 D1 ? Is it a coil burnout or the brushes ?

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Thu Feb 18, 2016 3:27 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Its one of these http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-mo ... ill-505099 Its a brushless motor so no easy fix like replacing brushes . New motor from different suppliers £160 or £230 thats quite a difference and cant work out why .
D1


Thu Feb 18, 2016 4:16 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
That price is quite high but it certainly appears to be a quality product. Unlike the 3040 CNC.

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Thu Feb 18, 2016 4:45 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Like the size of the 3040 thought if i ever get round to building one it will be a more robust copy.
My motor problem as got worse not sure if its motor or control board and i dont know anyway of testing . Any useful suggestion would be much appreciated :(
D1


Fri Feb 19, 2016 3:17 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
DISPLACEMENT 1 wrote:
Like the size of the 3040 thought if i ever get round to building one it will be a more robust copy.
My motor problem as got worse not sure if its motor or control board and i dont know anyway of testing . Any useful suggestion would be much appreciated :(
D1


Hi, would like to help but am a long way south with the sun for company for the next 3 weeks ;)

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Fri Feb 19, 2016 11:12 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Mike sun sounds good will be glad when spring hits .
I think i am going to have to take the plunge with the motor . Cost of the control board is about the same so got a fifty fifty chance . Never been a betting man but really think it is the motor it was making a unpleasant nose towards the end which i cant imagine a control fault been able to generate .
But could be wrong will let ya know . May end up with a spare motor !
D1


Fri Feb 19, 2016 12:50 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Yeah it was the motor :D £150 lighter but got a working mill now.
D1


Tue Feb 23, 2016 6:27 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Been doing a lot of milling new motor great seems quieter than original . Have a feeling the original came to me slightly knackerd . Got motor from here http://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catalogue ... s-DC-Motor good company to deal with ,
Also those Cutwel cuttershttp://www.cutwel.co.uk/milling/ ... on-ferrous a re proving very good as long as you dont knock the tip off :( They come with a little protective cap i always put in on when not actually cutting now .
D1


Wed Mar 09, 2016 1:51 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hey D1, so you are using this motor and those mills to cut aluminium ? What sort of rpm do you run the spindle at to cut aluminium and what sort of axis speed ?

steve

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Wed Mar 09, 2016 1:54 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Steve the spindle speed on my mill isn't great 2500rpm . This is the spec http://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catalogue ... less-Motor
But that been said i have used CNCs with spindle motors and they are loud ! I work from my shed so the mill i have is great it makes less noise than my washing machine . As for cutting speed it really depends on what ya doing but its not fast . I wouldnt want to mass produce anything with it .
The mills def give the best finish i have managed to get so far . In fact its considerably better and they dont seem to go dull .
[flickr]Image2016-03-09 17.48.47 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]


Wed Mar 09, 2016 3:03 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Looks like it does a fine job. My attempts with doing aluminium on the CNC haven't been great. Too much speed and not enough power are probably to issue. The only time I got a nice cut was when I accidentally ran the CNC through a piece aluminium at full axis movement when moving to align to a zero point. Didn't break anything either :shock:

steve

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Wed Mar 09, 2016 3:13 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi D1

I have posted a new topic especially for discussion of Leadshine drives. "Leadshine Dm series drives"

It presents new test results from a recent project and should be of interest...

My conclusion regarding your tests is that the motor you used was not well matched to the drive or not optimally set up.

Possibly also the power supply may play a part - ie. digital chopper drive vs analogue transformer.

Finally - the quality of the pulse train can be an issue? ie. what is generating the pulses and how smoothly it does this.

Either way it's clear the DM432C can deliver decent performance...


Fri Mar 11, 2016 10:19 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Had enough with messing about with Stepper drivers for time been :( . Need to get on with stuff finally got my big gears mounted to their ali hubs . Quite tough more than adequate for the pan tilt head . Really enjoying me laser cutter slight issue with side angle which i cant seem to resolve so left that one to :D
If ya need big gears prob a good way to go . Most big city's have places you can get stuff cut with a laser . i know of three in Manchester just like photocopier places in the old days .
[flickr]Image2016-03-14 14.34.29 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]
[flickr]Image2016-03-14 16.28.58 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]
D1


Mon Mar 14, 2016 8:48 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
D1 - I think you might like this? I'm sure you could pick it up for a good price...



Mon Mar 14, 2016 5:13 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Well thats a scary bit of kit which would not fit in my shed so i think i will give it a miss .
Think i was pushing my abilities recommissioning and upgrading the laser i have . Lots of potential to hurt myself and still dont think i have it lined up as good as i would like .
Will have another fiddle when i have time . Going to fire as laser pointer down the path instead of the high powered one . A lot safer that way !
D1


Tue Mar 15, 2016 1:30 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
This old forum getting very quiet these days not a single post in showcase theater for over two weeks . Used to be a hive of activity hey oh.
Well i am still plodding on with me big rig got new gearbox fitted to that old geared revolve . The job would have been a lot harder without it and they really quite expensive to buy . No play or back lash and no spongy feeling you get with belts so that good .
before
[flickr]
Image2016-02-22 11.32.58 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]
After
[flickr] Image2016-03-24 17.14.39 by D 1, on Flickr[/flickr]

Decided its time for a new lathe just struggling with my little clark thing . As anybody got any thoughts on these http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-en ... e-ax927507 I know its Chinese same make as my mill i think but its relativity small dont have much room really . Not many options out their :(
D1


Thu Mar 24, 2016 9:42 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
D1,

I used the same lathe when I did my Axminster lathe course. They have a room with about eight of them and I have to say I really liked it. And I was working with steel. It was great to get used to using the auto feed and stop really close to the end of the cut, then reverse.

I think for the money, they have everything you'll ever want.

Unlike my Wabeco, when you dial to cut, say, 1mm, you are actually cutting 2mm in diameter. I think that's the norm. For making threads, you need to swap some gears, but it's all provided with the kit. It's quite compact and quiet, good spindle speed control, very nice machine.

Edward


Thu Mar 24, 2016 11:52 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Edward yes i noticed some where that they use them in their training centers. They must take quite a hammering.
Had a look a quick look at the Wabeco i remember you mentioning them before . But slightly to big i literally have a meter for it to fit . Hence the SC4 it does seem rather noisy though which concerns me . I will give the Warrington branch a ring after the hols to see if they have one i can have a play with :D
Hows your garage conversion going have you got your mill set up yet ?
D1


Thu Mar 24, 2016 12:43 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Yes, it is quite compact compared to my Wabeco. But mine was second hand, so I had little choice. In hindsight, I think I probably should've bought the Axminster, less money and new, and more features. The important thing is to invest in a good chuck (on both sides).

The Axminster lathe was pretty quiet, best to see one in the flesh, you get so much for your money!

I am using my garage as it is, as I find you can't really hear the mill from outside, the noisiest thing is my electric hacksaw, also bought from Axminster

http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-si ... saw-200024

It's a lot less dangerous than my circular chop saw, which I really fear using.

Edward


Thu Mar 24, 2016 2:55 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi D1. The Axminsters seem to be selling at a premium price over there. The same model sold here under Sieg brand is about UK 1,070. You'll also need to factor extras like a 4 jaw chuck, drill chuck and tooling.

They also sell a German branded Chinese made lathe here called Optimum. They claim slightly better quality control and prices are comparable to the Sieg lathes.

Aside from that I'd consider a slightly larger lathe if possible - no matter what size chuck and through bore you have, there's always times you wish it was bigger... G


Thu Mar 24, 2016 4:19 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Thanks for comments the Axminster one is a re badged Sieg . Theirs also this one http://www.warco.co.uk/metal-lathes-met ... lathe.html which comes with a lot more tooling for the same price but its a tad long i would have to move my mill down a bit :( But the extra tooling does make it tempting . Looks similar to a Optimum i suppose.
Bigger would be better i agree but just haven't the space and if push comes to shove i have a friend who as a huge one!
Ps like the electric hacksaw i have a bandsaw with a metal blade . Quite good cant cut long bits but long enough to feed into mill and will tackle 15mm thick
D1


Fri Mar 25, 2016 3:03 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Some larger models have a short bed, or maybe you could use the hacksaw to shorten them>>> ?


Fri Mar 25, 2016 5:11 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
D1,
Spooky that you're looking at a new lathe just as I'm doing the same. I need a new shed first though.

I've done some looking around and asked a few questions about lathes available here in Australia, though the same lathes crop up all over the world under different brands. A chap called Rob, aka 'xynudu' has a very useful youtube channel full of helpful stuff (including casting round stock from scrap aluminium) and I also found and old website of his about his own choice of small lathe (CQ9325). It's a slightly bigger lathe than the ones you've looked at but the article is chock full of useful tips on what features you want to look for when choosing a lathe of any size. He claims to have looked at loads of lathes over the years and recons the Sieg (Axminster C4 is a Sieg) lathes are overpriced and lacking essential features, particularly relating to leadscrew reversing and speed changing.

https://www.youtube.com/user/xynudu/discussion
http://users.picknowl.com.au/~gloaming_ ... 25rev.html

The Warco looks to be a version of the 'standard' Chinese 9 x 20 lathe which is very common the world over. There is a Yahoo forum all about it if you're interested.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/9x20Lathe/info

Prices in the UK look very high. I thought Australia was an expensive place but you are paying similar Pounds for the same tool that we pay in AU Dollars, which means about twice the price.
The lathe I'm looking at is a variant of the 9 x 20. Link below for comparison. That price works out to about 800 quid and it comes with some useful extras that you would probably have to buy anyway.

https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/L160#

Note that all the above is second hand info based on web trawling and should be valued as such.

Kit


Sat Mar 26, 2016 8:03 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Cheers Kit i am all of a dither now . Had decided on the C4 but not sure now . Your potential purchase looks a good buy . The C4 from Axminster comes with nothing so when add on 4 jaw chuck face plate steadies etc it mounts up.
The Warco does come with extras so on the face of it much better value . Australia seems to have a border selection than the uk I wonder if i can get one direct from China ?
Anyways good look with the shed . I warn you once you have one you will never leave it . I used to have a social life :D
Are you doing anything for the STOPMO JAM bye the way .
D1


Sun Mar 27, 2016 2:32 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
One thing that the Axminster didn't have was variable and independent feed rate. If your lathe was spinning faster, your feed rate was also proportionally faster.
With my Wabeco, the feed rate is independent, so for example the lathe could be spinning fast whilst the feed rate could be slow, ideal for the last finishing pass. It is just adjusted by a potentiometer with a switch to its side for forw/reverse.

With the Axminster, you used the autofeed to get as close as possible to the end of the cut, then you stopped and continued manually using the scales. That way you never overrun the cut. I think this is normal practice.

It would be quite easy to adapt a lathe with a feed motor and an Arduino so that you could feed automatically to the same end every pass. I made such program in a few hours, including removal of backlash for every pass. I have not used it on the Wabeco, but even automating the horizontal feed only, it would improve the smoothness and accuracy no end.

Edward


Sun Mar 27, 2016 4:23 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Edward yes changing speed of the feed feed rate on the SC4 is a fath but it is possible thats how you get your different thread pitches . Its a matter of physically changing gears not something you would want to do every five minutes .
Like you idea of putting a motor on the feed screw but if was going to that i might as well go the all hog and convert it to a CNC lathe and let MACH 3 run it .
Would just need another motor on the crossfeed and some sort of speed control for the chuck . Suppose the SC4 lends itself to that been driven buy a brushless motor .
Having doubts about the Warco one well not the lathe more the company . After sales seems pretty bad and website is a bit of a clue to that . Always found Axminster very good to deal with which can be worth paying that bit extra for.
I will do a bit more mulling and Axminster haven't any SC4 in at mo
Edit
Quik vids of CNC conversion doesnt seem that hard .


This one very neat


D1


Sun Mar 27, 2016 6:07 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
D1,
It is very confusing trying to decide what's the best machine to get. Especially as I need to catch and aeroplane to get to the nearest shop where I can actually go and look at the stuff for real. And then you need to start spending money on tooling, although Bob (xynudu) seems to do well at making the tools he needs to make the tools he needs to make...
At the moment I'm doing more of a feasibility study than a serious plan. Just how much do I have to spend on machines and a shed in order to start making the things I want to make and will it all get used enough to justify the up-front expense? Not at all sure yet. Fun looking though!!!!
A major consideration here is the shipping cost. I really liked a lathe I saw available in Adelaide for $1100... Plus $1300 for shipping it to my house.

CNC conversion on those lathes doesn't look at all complicated. I suspect it would pay for itself quite quickly because of the savings made on special tools etc. you would need to do some jobs manually.

I considered the Stopmo Jam but we had a 3 week holiday recently which bit into the time available and I decided not to. That was before they extended the deadline, but I've been doing other things anyway. Including a major rebuild of my CNC router! More news soon.

Kit


Sun Mar 27, 2016 8:12 pm
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi, D1, this link might interest you between jobs http://coolcomponents.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=50a777ece60b8378f4f652ac4&id=b817574910&e=884f2ddb84
of course these things don't always turn out but may be worth a punt.
Nearly completed my slew bearing, missing a few screws to "complete", got the workshop warmed up nicely and decided to put a cleaning log on the dying embers of the wood burner, not sure what the fumes are so decided to vacate till tomorrow :oops:

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Tue Mar 29, 2016 5:46 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Mike was begin to think you had given up on the forum to which would have been a shame :( But glad you been busy with your mill dont know who you use for nuts and bolts etc but i use these https://www.orbitalfasteners.co.uk/ Very good usually get here next day and not that expensive. Building up quite a collection of stuff now always order a few things i dont need :D
The cool components looks interesting but as you say things always dont turn out ! May experience is its always the people who are the problem when i do jobs for unknowns. Making stuff is easy dealing with difficult people isn't.
Cleaning log ? never heard of one those does it kill of naughty logs . Hope you survive i assume you not a naughty log ? :)
D1


Tue Mar 29, 2016 7:26 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
DISPLACEMENT 1 wrote:
Hi Mike was begin to think you had given up on the forum to which would have been a shame :( But glad you been busy with your mill dont know who you use for nuts and bolts etc but i use these https://www.orbitalfasteners.co.uk/ Very good usually get here next day and not that expensive. Building up quite a collection of stuff now always order a few things i dont need :D
The cool components looks interesting but as you say things always dont turn out ! May experience is its always the people who are the problem when i do jobs for unknowns. Making stuff is easy dealing with difficult people isn't.
Cleaning log ? never heard of one those does it kill of naughty logs . Hope you survive i assume you not a naughty log ? :)
D1

Always look at forum if not posting to it, Had (have) a lot of gardening work, building raised beds whilst the sun shone and greenhouse preparation in the showers. Nuts and bolts, I use a local supplier for small quantities but will look at the link you posted.
Cleaning log, a chemical "log" that helps keep chimney clean - http://www.thisisitstores.co.uk/chimney ... 0wodR0sKAA
Still need to use the chimney brush and rods as well, not nearly as good as the old fashioned chimney boys of yesteryear
;)

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Tue Mar 29, 2016 10:24 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi, Kit, this might be of use for creating models: http://makezine.com/2015/01/26/this-web ... 3d-models/
also in the site is an article on "Cold casting" of metallic/resin moulded items.

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Wed Apr 06, 2016 3:20 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
D1, a couple of photos at long last of slew bearing, still have to drill mounting holes when I find a use for it ;)
A good exercise in designing in CamBam and learning the capabilities of my mill.
Stock size was 15mm thick , next one with smaller thrust bearings will be 10mm, another exercise in machining.

Will be doing a bit more experimenting with the profiling capabilities, got the hang of inside/outside cutting and Plus/Minus value settings nearly ;)

Your mammoth projects looks to be going well, watching with interest. Still waiting for my carbon fibre rail to arrive :(


Attachments:
SlewFront.jpg
SlewFront.jpg [ 62.74 KiB | Viewed 5557 times ]
SlewRear800.jpg
SlewRear800.jpg [ 59.71 KiB | Viewed 5557 times ]
SlewSide800.jpg
SlewSide800.jpg [ 59.23 KiB | Viewed 5557 times ]

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Wed Apr 27, 2016 2:29 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Mike - the surface milling is always a nice touch... reminds me of the inside of an old pin registered camera. I guess you are going for slow but sure? Must be like 400:1 or more overall?

In contrast here is a Spinea TS200 gear unit I'm playing with, which weighs about 15kg - the input torque required to just turn it over is 1Nm or more. The internal gear is a similar to the Japanese Sumitomo Cyclo gears - also used in big robots... :)


Attachments:
Spinea TS200.JPG
Spinea TS200.JPG [ 84.29 KiB | Viewed 5555 times ]
Wed Apr 27, 2016 2:43 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Mike,

I'm sure that slew bearing can move a baby elephant with that kind of reduction!

Would be interested to see how you have bedded/centred the thrust bearings, I just wonder if you have any photos handy that show more of the thrust bearings and the machining to accommodate them.

If you have:)

Edward


Wed Apr 27, 2016 4:33 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
Hi Mike looking really good not to dissimilar to mine except i cheated and used the laser cutter for the big cog . My mill not able to do the diameter i needed looks like you have more Y travel . I always struggle in that department :(
Lots of potential uses i assume it would be a able to move a boom quite well . I quit like 15mm to machine now i used to use 5mm a lot but found it chattered . !5 mm just sits their . If you got the time just pocket everything out strong and light .
Cncs are great though my best buy i think although my new wedalar is quite good too :D
D1


Wed Apr 27, 2016 4:58 am
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Post Re: CAD, CAM, CNC etc.
edward wrote:
Hi Mike,

I'm sure that slew bearing can move a baby elephant with that kind of reduction!

Would be interested to see how you have bedded/centred the thrust bearings, I just wonder if you have any photos handy that show more of the thrust bearings and the machining to accommodate them.

If you have:)

Edward

Hi, Edward, I have not taken any photos but will see what I can do.

The bearings are partially embedded in circular pockets.
The gear has pockets either side with outer diameters of 70mm and an inner diameters of 50mm x 2.5mm deep ? + the 25mm centre hole. It started as a 100mm square and the machining datum zero was set at the centre. The first op was to machine an 8mm pilot hole, the pocket was machined on one side.
The X and Y axis were sent to zero and the block turned over. I used the 8mm milling cutter to line up Y axis with the pilot hole and re-clamped the block, machined the second pocket and lastly the 48mm bore hole that allow the clamping bolts to pass through from the back to front plate
The pocket on the 100 x 180 mm backplate was machined by marking out a 100 x 100mm square and zeroing off the diagonals. The 25mm bore and clamping bolt holes were also machined in the same operation to ensure they were concentric with the pocket.
Front plate as above 100 x 100mm stock with centre on diagonals (zero). Milled pocket + 25mm bore and bolt holes in one operation. This way the front and back pockets and bolt holes line up even if the machine is not set exactly to the centre of the diagonals by using the same G-Code.
Hopefully the explanation is fairly clear :?:

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Wed Apr 27, 2016 5:34 am
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