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 How-to 
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Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2008 8:14 pm
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Location: SW Va
Post How-to
http://howto.wired.com/wiki/Photograph_the_Stars

What do you guys think of the how-to? Might be worth sending your photos in too. Do any of you actually use a telescope to take your photos?


Thu Oct 02, 2008 4:11 pm
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Post Re: How-to
I've never fully engaged in astro-photography per say... I do envy the really robust telescope mounts that the serious dudes use though!


Thu Oct 02, 2008 6:16 pm
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Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2008 2:15 pm
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Post Re: How-to
This Orion shot is freekin beautiful...

Image


Fri Oct 03, 2008 3:48 pm
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Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 12:36 pm
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Location: Antarctica/California/New Zealand
Post Re: How-to
I've never used an actual telescope, but I've done a lot of shots with 600mm or more.
The atmospherics have to be really good to not get wobble or distortion in a TL sequence, the tripod needs to be rock solid, no wind, and the frame rate needs to be pretty much as fast as the camera will handle as things move through the shot fast.
I will sometimes use the mirror lock-up function to help minimize camera shake too, but the trade off is it reduces the frame rate.

Moon passing behind Robert Scott's memorial cross on Observation Hill...


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Fri Oct 03, 2008 5:00 pm
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Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2008 8:40 pm
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Location: Montréal, Canada
Post Re: How-to
timescapes wrote:
This Orion shot is freekin beautiful...

Image

I agree! I don't know how it has actually been done, but the way it looks I would suggest the following: multiple monochrome CCD shots with LRGB filters, averaged dark frames and bias frames substractions for noise reduction, and a lot of knowledge and experience put in the final tweeking of the image! Beautiful results, though not very practical for timelapse...


Sat Oct 04, 2008 11:26 am
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Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2008 8:40 pm
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Location: Montréal, Canada
Post Re: How-to
milapse wrote:
I've never fully engaged in astro-photography per say... I do envy the really robust telescope mounts that the serious dudes use though!

A telescope mount is not always needed for astrophotography. Many celestial objects are large enough to use short to medium telephotos. You can use a simple barndoor device (I think it has been discussed on another post) or, better a motorized equatorial head. I used an AstroTrac 320 (now replaced by AstroTrac 320X: http://www.astrotrac.com/) to shoot the August 1st total solar eclipse from Mongolia. You just need a stable photo tripod and preferably a geared head (to precisely polar align the tracking device). It is perfect for DSLR astrophotography. I had a Super-16 Bolex SBM with motor and 300mm lens on it and it performed very well. You could easily mount a DSLR with a short or medium telephoto on it, and it will do the job for exposures of 5 to 10 minutes (longer than that requires very precise polar alignment).


Sat Oct 04, 2008 11:52 am
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Post Re: How-to
rlavoie wrote:
timescapes wrote:
This Orion shot is freekin beautiful...

Image

I agree! I don't know how it has actually been done, but the way it looks I would suggest the following: multiple monochrome CCD shots with LRGB filters, averaged dark frames and bias frames substractions for noise reduction, and a lot of knowledge and experience put in the final tweeking of the image! Beautiful results, though not very practical for timelapse...


Timelapse.. Hehe... I think you would need intervals on the order of one exposure per century or millennium to see movement in nebulae.


Sun Oct 05, 2008 11:12 pm
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Post Re: How-to
Right, that is if you want to see movement in the nebula. But you could see the movement of the nebula in the sky overnight, because it is way larger than the full moon, in fact, twice its diameter. Imagine if we could achieve this kind of results in a few seconds, and see this jewel move across the sky! Wow!


Mon Oct 06, 2008 5:34 am
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Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2008 8:14 pm
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Location: SW Va
Post Re: How-to
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/10/0 ... pstoryview

Looks like the people in the States are going to miss this one completely but it sounds really exciting. An asteroid about the size of a car is supposed to enter our atmosphere at 10:46 p.m. ET (2:46 a.m. GMT) tonight and should be visible to the people of Africa, Europe, and parts of the Asian countries!


Mon Oct 06, 2008 3:41 pm
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