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 Camera Settings for Astrophotography 
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Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2011 9:45 am
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Post Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Well am pretty new to both timelapse and astrophotography.I ve shot starts couple of times with not so good results,yesterday i did some stacking (12 bright and 12 dark) and the day after tomorrow i am gonna be traveling to mt Paggaion which is the most dark area in my place to do some more serius shooting, thus i would like to know the best possible settings for my D7000 to get best results.

What i have in mind right now is :
18mm i will shoot about 20secs
f3.5 (which the max apature i can get).
iso3200 or even 6400 (should i shoot even higher?what do you think?)
Noise reduction off
Long exposure NR off (or on?)
on a tripod of course.
Lens Hood on (i don't think it helps a lot for city lights etc, but will help for sure if i turn on any kind of light for other usage).
I am about to shoot about 100 bright and 20dark.

I am gonna edit with DSS (deep sky stacker).


Any comment - hint is more than wellcome.

Guys who are interested in that thread, have a look at Nightsky Timelapse Thread too.

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Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Thu Jul 28, 2011 12:35 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
yes, long NR off... the long exposure NR is basically doing a single stack, you dont want this, the stacking program works better.

if you are on the northern hemisphere shoot south and you will get the milkyway

try ISO 6400 for a sample shot, so far i have great luck with ISO 5000 on my D7000. the other settings look to be right.

If you google "Dark sky finder" and find the overlay map, i shoot normally in a dark blue region or green.

make sure the sun is well past setting.

make sure you ADL is shut off too, NO VR.

Focus with live view, find a bright star, zoom in, manually focus, shut off the focus motor.

You dont need 100, i would go for 30 lights, 10-15 darks, and play around and shoot a few directions. This works well for wide starfield, the 100's seem to be best for telephoto on stuff like nebula and other galaxies.




Do youtube tutorials on DSS, and how to process the images, they always look like crap straight out of DSS, you have to massage the image in DSS a bit, then move to photoshop or something to do the final touches.

Good luck and post your results!

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Thu Jul 28, 2011 1:50 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Thank you very much.When i have a fair result, i will do post :)

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My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Thu Jul 28, 2011 5:07 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
So, here is the result of my first attempt.

Image
Milky Way from Kavala, Greece. by TheoKondak, on Flickr


Camera : Nikon D7000
Lenses : Nikkor 18-70 f3.5-f4.5
Shutter Speed : 30seconds
Apature : f3.5
ISO : 3200
NR : OFF (all NR options was set to off)
ADL : OFF
Focal Length : 18mm (1.5Crop)
Edited in : Deep Sky Stalker and post prosessing in Adobe Lightroom 3.4

The picture is result of 12 Bright and 12 dark frames.

DSS: Changed a bit luminance (up to 24), Lightroom, lowered a bit exposure, added some contrast, changed a bit image temprature, and added some noise reduction.

Its more than obvious that 30sec for 18mm crop is too much, thus i will try 20seconds next time.Composition also is kinda bad, but i was there just to get some test shots.

Again, any hints, tips corrections are more than wellcome.Tomorrow night is the night!

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My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Fri Jul 29, 2011 2:37 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Not bad! You got the milky way, tons of stars, it is a very good start, but I think you can do better! Astrophotography is a pain in the butt, screw one thing up and a whole night of shooting was wasted, but it is very rewarding when you get an excellent shot. :)

where you are at, can you clearly see the milkyway? or is it barely visable? Where i shoot it is clearly visable above, other places i have been it almost looks like a very light cloud. Do you have any light pollution maps out there to reference? The darker the area the better!

I say knock the exposure down to 20 seconds, bump up ISO to 5000.

You dont need as many darks as lights, try to get 15-20 lights, 10 darks should be good but there is nothing wrong with getting extra.

Your focus looks like it was off, find a very bright star, with the camera on a tripod find the star in the viewfinder then turn on live-view. Zoom in with live view as fas as you can on the star and manually focus on it untill it is as small and sharp as possible, then be very careful not to bump the focus ring. Make sure autofocus is OFF

not sure but it looks like there is a slight green cast to the image, it may need a slight shift to the magenta.


ON DSS i use MEDIAN on the stacking mode for the lights and darks with good results. personally i think it works better than the kappa mode when doing starfields.

The link below is an EXCELLENT DSS tutorial. The only thing to be ware of, ESPECIALLY with the D7000 is the 2xDrizzle, i do NOT reccomment it, the D7000 is a high resolution camera, i would only use the 2x Drizzle on 6mp and under, it basically doubles the resolution and you can end up with gigantic files so large photoshop wont even open them.

The curve adjustment part of this is the real trick.

http://flintstonestargazing.com/2009/06 ... -tutorial/

and be VERY careful with noise reduction, i am VERY gentle with noise reduction. it is a very fine line between noise and stars. generally if you get a good set of images and stack correctly you will need almost no noise reduction.

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Fri Jul 29, 2011 7:23 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
The fun part is when you finally get the process down, is finding new and fun places to get your starfield shots. :)

have you ever thought about building a tracker by chance?

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Fri Jul 29, 2011 7:25 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Thanks for sharing all these great info Jack!I will be trying some all night shooting project tomorrow night at the top of a mountain in my area (1800meters high).Its not really a very good spot to do serius astrophotography, since the mountain is surounded by vilages and the national road but its the best i can do to get some pictures without having to travel to an island or to Greek-Bulgarian Borders (which is about 80miles from my home).

According to some Dark Sky maps, the closest super dark area to my place is Thasos and the ULTIMATE place is beach Kipi in Samothrake which of course is very hard to go unless i m on vacations (which is gonna be happening the next week!).

Tonight i will be making the live view mode focus thingy,which is something i didn't last time.Also, i will be shooting Lossless 14bit RAW files, since like that i will be getting the max info from my sensor.

My schedule is pretty heavy (job, student at University, photographer and so many more) so i can't find time to study on how to make a tracker.Sometime in the future i would LOVE to do some DYI stuff like a tracker and a dolly.

By the way, when is the best period to shoot astrophotography?Maybe sometime during fall (North Hemisphere).

PS: i will also remove UV filter.Also, i ve noticed that lens hood is creating some kind of vigneting and thinking of not using it at all.

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Fri Jul 29, 2011 8:09 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
my dear astrodiary,


Last night i went on the local mountain again to take some shots.Unfortunately JUST when i arrived the sky went cloudy..I had time to get couple of shots, that there was still some non occupied sky, with the seemingly correct focus.I found out, that the stars seems to be in focus when my indicator is a bit further than 2m.

Needless to say that it was very hard for me to get some stars in live view mod even in 25600iso, since the minimum speed i could use was 1/30sec.Is there a way to fix that?Probably the video settings interfere there and are not allowing me to set up a slower shutter speed, but is it even possible to disable this?My alternative is shooting some 5-10second pics with random focus settings and then keep the best.

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Sat Jul 30, 2011 1:53 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Yesterday, i went to Paggaio.I knew its gonna be a good night!I left my friends partying at a beach bar, i picked up my bro,my camera,my tripod and couple of beers, and headed to thy old Ski resort.There, i made my setup, which was not as good as i hoped judging from post processing composition, and started a shooting marathon.Of ~130 shots, about 80 was ruined by moisture on the lens.It was frustrating when i went to check and found out that the lens filter was full of droplets.Anyway, thats why i wont make the sort Timelapse i was hoping.

Paggaio, turned out to be a very good place for astrophotography, since its prety dark at the top.Only downside is that its about 25km of bad road to make it to the spot.

In this pic, you see part of the Mikly-Way rising from thy Egg top of Paggaio.

Image
Παγγαίο 11 by TheoKondak, on Flickr

Again, i had problems focusing.I tried to focus on Jupiter, which was the brightest object by the time, but i am not happy with the results.

Shutter Speed 20sec
A : 3.5
Focal Length : 18mm
ISO : 5000
NR : OFF
ADL : OFF

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Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Sun Jul 31, 2011 2:52 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
very nice!!! :D

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Sun Jul 31, 2011 2:20 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Nice shoots! I've just purchased a D7000 and after reading this thread have been inspired to have a go at Astrophotography. Unfortunately there is a lot of light pollution in my area and clouds are frequent. Anyways I'll give it ago sometime this week and see how I go.

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Mon Aug 01, 2011 4:29 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Meh 626 wrote:
Nice shoots! I've just purchased a D7000 and after reading this thread have been inspired to have a go at Astrophotography. Unfortunately there is a lot of light pollution in my area and clouds are frequent. Anyways I'll give it ago sometime this week and see how I go.


Give it a try, the first time i shot a Nebula i was in a very heavily light polluted area. :)

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Mon Aug 01, 2011 5:57 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Hello guys
first of all, i must say how amazed was i a couple months ago when i first saw the shots of milky way. its constantly in my mind now, which made me research for details of the amazing photos all over the places, which lead me here. So congrats for the great work :)
So i intend to be part of this forum now, and learn from everybody here. however, i cant afford a top camera, for their prices here in brazil are very abusive. i intend to buy a nikon d3100, and i was wondering if i can shot milky way with it. ofcourse along the time ill improove my equip, but right now thats all i can do =/

thanks in advance


Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:12 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Hello Victor and wellcome to our community.What i can suggest you from my little exp is to:
First of all find a very dark place at your area.Dark place is very improtant for varius reasons that will be explained later.With your D3100 you will not be able to shoot higher than ISO1600.That means that you will be gettin almost half light from stars that shooting in ISO5000 (as suggested by Jack above).Nevertheless, you wont be able to decrease your shutter speed (else you will be getting blurry stars).Also, you can't go less than F3.5 probably with the kit lens (which i suppose is what you gonna have with your camera).So, i am getting back to the dark place parameter, which will allow you shooting with the best available settings for your gear with best possible results.
Settins you should use that wont be the same as mine is just ISO.Use 1600.The rest should be the same.Also try stacking more than 30-40 pictures so you get some extra light (see Ultimate Astrophotography Post).

Your next purchace should be a prime lens which will be lighter.Even a very cheap old,manual focus will be fine.What you have to search though is mm.Get the wider possible, unless you go for deep sky photography.

If you find mistakes at my post sorry but it is very hard for me to focus on Samothrake Island.Everywhere is like a live music concert with people singing and playing music!

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:51 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
in nikon website, it says d3100 goes from 100 to 3200. 100-1600 is for D3000 model (correct me if im wrong, for i may not completly understand).
thank you very much for the tips. i guess that if the iso is rly an essue, i can wait another month and buy 5100 which goes until 6400 :)
by the end of the year if i still have a job, ill buy new lenses, and hopefully, untill then, ill be understanding a lot more.
ill keep in track of this thread and whole forum for now on, and tell whatever happens with me and my photos

cheers from brazil


Thu Aug 04, 2011 2:20 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
victorelessar, good afternoon.

Remember, not all ISO settings are the same between cameras models. I would recommend that you go over to a site like DPReview and see if the noise tests between these two cameras match each other or your expectations. 6400 is generally very ugly on most cameras, and the best quality noise I've seen so far is from the 5DmkII and the 7D. Personally, I am currently stuck using Canons, so I cannot speak about how their newer 4/3rds work with noise, but IMO, the D700 is noisier than the 7D in long exposures, so I would recommend you do your research first.

Good luck, and I look forward to what ever work you generate.
BDU



victorelessar wrote:
in nikon website, it says d3100 goes from 100 to 3200. 100-1600 is for D3000 model (correct me if im wrong, for i may not completly understand).
thank you very much for the tips. i guess that if the iso is rly an essue, i can wait another month and buy 5100 which goes until 6400 :)
by the end of the year if i still have a job, ill buy new lenses, and hopefully, untill then, ill be understanding a lot more.
ill keep in track of this thread and whole forum for now on, and tell whatever happens with me and my photos

cheers from brazil

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Thu Aug 04, 2011 3:46 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
For astrophotography go 3200, I used 3200 with my d90 and got some good results, the 3100 has a better sensor. I normally go 5000 and 6400 with my d7k. Fwiw, it outdoes my shooting partners 7D in high ISO and dynamic range noticeably. The 7d is still a pretty sweet machine.

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Thu Aug 04, 2011 4:42 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Hey Jack...

After that last post, I looked over at DPReview on the 5100, and it is much better at high ISO than the 3100, and I'd say it was marginally better than the 7D and the D7000.

So, like I said, it is always good to have some side-by-sides before one buys.

Anyway, keep up the great work, luv your stuff.
BDU


Jack Ripper wrote:
For astrophotography go 3200, I used 3200 with my d90 and got some good results, the 3100 has a better sensor. I normally go 5000 and 6400 with my d7k. Fwiw, it outdoes my shooting partners 7D in high ISO and dynamic range noticeably. The 7d is still a pretty sweet machine.

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Thu Aug 04, 2011 6:31 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Image

My first attempt, nothing special and was shot in a heavily light polluted area.

Processing in DSS and PhotoShop CS5.

18 light, 6 dark.

Shutter: 5 sec
A: 3.5
Focal Length: 18mm
ISO: 5000
NR: OFF
ADL: OFF

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Fri Aug 05, 2011 3:16 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Nice! Its neat to see stuff from the bottom half! is that shooting south? I dont think i have ever seen that before.

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Fri Aug 05, 2011 10:41 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Hi guys,

Here is my first attempt. Still have a lot to learn especially post procesing in DSS . Was tracked on an orion teletrack AZ-G but couldnt get longer than 25 sec exposures without stars turning to pills at 16mm, will have to look into the reasoning behind this.

any advice/comments is welcome :D


Attachments:
File comment: 5d mkii
16mm
iso 3200 25sec
33 lights 11darks
stacked in dss

star1.jpg
star1.jpg [ 27.64 KiB | Viewed 28720 times ]
Sat Aug 06, 2011 2:54 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Jack Ripper wrote:
Nice! Its neat to see stuff from the bottom half! is that shooting south? I dont think i have ever seen that before.


That was shooting to the east. It was hardly visible to the naked eye so had to use Sky Safari on my iPhone to find it.

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Sun Aug 07, 2011 3:41 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
If I'm taking multiple 30 sec frames on a tripod alone with a 11-16mm lens, how do you account for Earth's rotation. The stars are going to shift in each frame lasting 30 secs. Is that all taken care of in DSS?

BTW nice pictures everyone. Hoping to achieve similar results! :)


Thu Aug 18, 2011 8:54 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
If you are shooting a sky only shot, and if you're not tracking, your stack will end up being the greatest common crop of all the images in the stack.

Remember, relative to your exposure time, the position of the stars relative to e/o are static.

So if you don't have any Earthly content in your shot (like trees or mountains), your stars will stack fine over time.

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Thu Aug 18, 2011 9:42 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Hi guys!
I am new to astrophotography and I started really recently after reading this tips & tricks thread. I have to say that Jack made amazing work.
Your tips really work and therefore I was able to achieve nice results at the first time. Thank You Jack!

This is my best shot of summer Milky Way so far from August:
Image
EXIF is following:
ISO3200, f=50mm, 6sec, F/1.6, WB 5300K (NR off, long exposure NR off)
Stacked from 30 light and 15 dark frames.

I have also make an wideangle shot but it is crep...the previouse image came out od DSS very bright and colorful so I had to make only a few edits.
This wide shot was initialy very dark and i had to do a lot of curves and levels.
Here is the bad result:
Image
EXIF is following:
ISO3200, f=17, 13sec, F/4, WB 5300K (NR off, long exposure NR off)
Stacked from 25 light and 10 dark frames.

My question is if You know where I possibly made a mistake.
You can see liderly lines from noise on this image I do not know if it depands on some settings in DSS or I have used short time of exposure...
I'd like to achieve some wide agle shot as was shown earlier in this topic but I don't know how and what I should change...

Greetings from Czech Republic and clear skies,
Mikel


Wed Sep 21, 2011 7:21 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
are you shooting with canon?

im trying to see what you are referring to, i see very slight horizontal lines, that is why i wonder if you are shooting canon. I see these on my friends 7D from time to time. The horizontal lines i am seeing could be a result of the image hosting site of this un-calibrated monitor i have at work.

The first image looks awesome, beautiful coloring, wonderful amount of stars! Absolutely awesome! :)

the second one, way too much noise reduction. it looks like the left side of the image is towards the horizon? there seems to be a good amount of light pollution, or i suppose it could be sensor heat? You should have been able to pull more stars out i believe. What camera / lens? and how much light pollution is out there? If there is any sort of light in the direction of the horizon you are shooting stay off the horizon.

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Wed Sep 21, 2011 8:11 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Thank You for Your reply!
Yes, I'm shooting with canon 50D and that horizontal lines are realy there, it´s olt a mistake of a monitor.
Refering to the second image-it was photographed in this direction and I think that it is not a light polution, cause we were in the less poluted part we coud get in our country. But there were some cars on the road. That is maybe the reason. Anyway, it was taken with canon 17-80mm F4.0-5.6 and i did no NR in the post process, but i did a lot of curves and levels adjustments, because the image came realy dark from thr DSS. Would more light frames help? Or should i wait after shooting previouse composition, to let the sensor cold down?


Wed Sep 21, 2011 10:32 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
you could try shooting for 13 sec then give it a 13 second cool down for the noise in the second image, IF that is heat sensor noise.

the banding, ugh, banding in the shadows, i dont understand why it is there, I am a Nikon shooter, but when processing high iso images of my shooting partners 7D when trying to pull detail out of shadows i seem to find that banding from time to time. This worries me because last weekend i picked up a Canon 60D to use for timelapse and astrophography.

im gonna try to do some research, maybe find out if the banding is repeatable and demonstrable, if so, that should mean there are ways to avoid it. i have seen hundreds of absolutely stunning astro photos done by canon, its even preferred over nikon because nikon blocks out some wavelengths of light that nebulas emit.

YET, there is this issue of banding, i have never seen it in Nikon only Canon, and it looks the same every time it happens, and ive seen a couple people complain of it where it shows up on some images and not others, in general photography as well as astrophotography.

You should load the LIGHTS into photoshop or whatever your editor of choice is, throw up an exposure adjustment layer and brighten it up as much as you can, see if you can see the banding, and check each image, there MIGHT be a single image that is causing this. If so, you can simply discard that one and try with the others.

If i find any information on this banding issue ill get back to you on it.

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Wed Sep 21, 2011 11:34 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/sho ... p?t=589925

there is some info on the banding... it may seem that pushing the ISO on canon will cause this. Which is unfortunate, i think a lot of the astrphotography images i have seen were tracked, and probably sitting at lower ISO levels.

You should be able to recreate this just by going outside and shooting high iso at a dark area and seeing if there is a point it starts to show up

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Wed Sep 21, 2011 11:48 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
I have also another issue: that good image above is done with 50mm prime lense on F1.6, so lot of light. That second one is done at F4.0 but wider 17mm lens. When I stacked that first one, I had to do only slight adjustments because it came out of DSS VERY bright and colourful. BUT that second one came out very DARK so i had to bright it a lot. Should I take more lights, or set other stacking method? Or it is just cause of that lense?


Wed Sep 21, 2011 11:56 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Mikel wrote:
I have also another issue: that good image above is done with 50mm prime lense on F1.6, so lot of light. That second one is done at F4.0 but wider 17mm lens. When I stacked that first one, I had to do only slight adjustments because it came out of DSS VERY bright and colourful. BUT that second one came out very DARK so i had to bright it a lot. Should I take more lights, or set other stacking method? Or it is just cause of that lense?


its probably because you were shooting at F/4, you might try going a little longer on that exposure, you should be able to get maybe 20 seconds or so before the stars start to turn into pills at 17mm

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Wed Sep 21, 2011 1:43 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
So glad to find this forum! Amazing stuff here! Looking forward to contributing!

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Fri Sep 23, 2011 9:49 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Hi guys, can somebody please explain me what you think by dark and light shots? Thank you

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Wed Mar 14, 2012 10:15 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
doctor9800 wrote:
Hi guys, can somebody please explain me what you think by dark and light shots? Thank you


Light shots are the images you are taking of the stars.

The darks are images taken with the same camera settings with the lens cap on. These MUST be shot with the same settings like shutter speed, ISO, etc as the lights.

The dark frames are used by the stacking software to produce a sensor profile to help lower the noise and remove artifacts from the image, as well as boost details that are too subtle to see on the lights by themselves.


I usually got to a 2:1 ratio lights vs darks, so if i take 10 lights, i take 5 darks. I also always do them immediately after i am done collecting the lights, this way the camera and sensor are the same ambient temperature.

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Wed Mar 14, 2012 10:45 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
Thank you for quick and understandable answer. With your answer and DSS tutorial it makes sense for me now. I will post some results of my efforts, when wheater will get better.

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Wed Mar 14, 2012 11:06 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
OK, I tried to make some astro photos, but I am not sure about results.

picture 1
ISO 3200
15mm
exp. 30s
2.8
16 light and 8 dark frames
Attachment:
stack.jpg [184.7 KiB]
Downloaded 209 times


pict2
ISO3200
Av 2.8
15mm
25s
16 light 8 dark
Attachment:
stack2.jpg [239.6 KiB]
Downloaded 209 times


stacked in DSS, some postprocessing in photoshop

I hope that stacking will help, but when I compare single shot to stacked photo, I feel better about single shot. Where are colors in stacked photos?
I know that big problem is big light pollution and totally inapropriate time for milky way (it is hidden bellow the horizon for 3/4) and little foggy weather, but any advices?

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Sun Mar 25, 2012 10:06 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
just to compare, this is single frame. You can compare to stacked one posted above.
Image
Milky way by doctor9800, on Flickr

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Tue Mar 27, 2012 10:51 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
there really is sort of an art on how to massage the images in the stacking program. Normally ill stay off the drizzle, go for kappa median, then do a little massaging in the levels and RGB curves in the stacking program and bump the saturation a bit, Then save to a TIFF, and pull it in CS5 where i do the real work.

There are some pretty good DSS tutorials on you tube which showed me a lot. With proper stacking you should pull a LOT more of the milkyway out on that image. I really do like that single frame image though. it looks very nice :)

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Tue Mar 27, 2012 11:19 am
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
I have similar issues that doctor98000 has. Single frames I shot are always better-looking than stacking results (less stars, very dark images). I did a lot of trials with differents DSS settings, but...

I also try different workflows (Raw -> Tiff -> DSS) and (Raw -> DSS) and didn't understand results : my first workflow produce more coloured results with more than stars than the second one, and it seems to me contradictory. I'll post some examples soon.


Thu Mar 29, 2012 10:43 pm
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Post Re: Camera Settings for Astrophotography
http://flintstonestargazing.com/2009/06 ... -tutorial/

This is the tutorial i sort of use as a guide, going with these basic settings and method expecially in the post-work in DSS is what gives me the best results. i usually keep the saturation between 18-25

then i take it into Adobe Photoshop to tweak it even further

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Fri Mar 30, 2012 5:51 am
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