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 Nighsky Timelapse Tutorial 
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Post Nighsky Timelapse Tutorial
LAST UPDATE: 10/15/2011

As a continuation to the settings thread, i am starting this thread. The subject here is the correct settings and procedure, in order to make a time lapse footage that will capture the spin of Earth. This time, i have some minor experience shooting starts and after couple of failed attempts (for various reasons) i am here to give some sort of tutorial for other starters. Please feel free to contribute by adding hints and tips wherever you think are necessary.


Place and Conditions

First of all, the place. As has been discussed in a lot of threads in this forum, the place is a basic component of the result. The ideal place is a place isolated enough, so you won’t capture any human source light (roads, cities, villages etc). In order to find a good spot in your place (if there is one) try googling "Dark Sky map Europe" or America or wherever you are. Another thing you can take into consideration is the altitude. Generally, higher altitudes provide better pictures (atmospheric factors).
Another thing that you have to keep in mind is the time and season. The Sun must be down a hundred per cent, the moon must not be visible, and I am pretty sure that there is a difference shooting in the summer, fall, winter or spring. If I am correct, the best time to shoot is in August and September. If anyone knows more about the subject, please enlighten us.


Camera Settings and Gear


The camera settings are a very significant factor. You should always shoot in manual mode on all settings (Shutter Speed, Aperture, ISO, White balance, Focus etc). Shooting time lapse videos (and not deep sky etc. still pictures) of the stars has some differences to shooting still pictures. Also, shooting RAW images will let you post process them with great efficiency in terms of color correction, noise reduction and so many others that are beyond the scope of this post. Consider shooting the maximum size and quality pictures your camera allows. The more info that is written in a file the more the flexibility in post processing, plus resizing big pictures to smaller will reduce the noise.
I haven’t had much field practice, so the settings here will be a mix of experience and (informed) guesswork.

Shooting in high ISO is mandatory. My camera allows me to shoot at 5000 ISO with affordable noise levels. Some cameras might allow you to shoot even higher, other cameras will max out at 1600 etc. Generally, keep in mind that you can post process the noise up to a point, so try to keep ISO high.

Aperture is the second of the three settings that will affect the light gathering in your camera. At the moment I have no lens that can go wider than f3.5, so I can't comment on the consequences of going less than that, but feel free to add to that. From what I’ve heard f1.8 and less might cause some problems.

Shutter speed is the third parameter.As you might know from still astro pics, as earth spins, the stars tend to look like pills, if the shutter is open for more than a specific time.That time is defined by thy 650 rule, which you can see bellow.Thus, you really should mind your shutter speed, unless you wanna have results with swollen stars.Believe me you don't.Also, keep in min,d that you should not let a gap among intervals.The time between the end of one shot and the begining of the other must be almost imidiate.You can let your sencor chill for 1-2 seconds, but thats it.

This is what happens when you let some seconds between intervals:

You can see that the video is a bit choppy.This is because, I was shooting at 40seconds shutter speed, every 46 seconds. I should be shooting at e.g. 40 seconds, every 41 seconds.

About Pill Shape effect: As i said before, pill shape is not that big deal for timelapse astrophotography, nevertheless, there is the 650 rule (thanks to flyvholm) which will help you take care of the effect in case you decide you don't want it for some reason.This rule goes like:Lets say you got a crop sencor camera, and a 18-55mm lens and you are shooting at 18mm.What you have to do in order to apply this rule is firstly to convert your crop sencor focal length to a full frame camera focal length; for 18 on a Nikon this will be 18*1.5=27 and for a Canon it will be 18*1.6=28.8mm.Then you do 650/27=24Seconds for Nikon or 22 seconds for Canon.The other day, i was shooting at 10mm (15mm full frame) for 40seconds.According to the above rule, i should not have the pill effect, but that was not true.So you might wanna avoid such long exposures, even when you are going so wide.

White Balance should be about 3000 and 3800 Kelvin, but if you are shooting RAW you can just leave White balance for later.
Any Noise Reduction setting should be set to OFF. Among the reasons is that if you shoot, say at 25seconds, then your camera will need approx. another 25 seconds to process the picture, which is bad battery-wise and time-wise. In my camera there are also settings like Long Exposure NR and Active D-Lighting which are set to OFF as well.
The focal length for general Astrophotography Timelapses should be the least available. In my case that is 18mm, which is ok. Others might have wider lenses, like 10mm or 12mm which I believe is the optimum. Don't forget that fish-eye lenses were created for such kind of photography!

Focus should be set to “infinite” manually, lest your camera end up hunting for focus for ever and ever. But how can you be sure that you are focused sharp? Well in my case (Nikkor 18-70mm) focus on “infinite” at 18mm is just a bit over 2 meters. There is no marked indicator, unfortunately, which makes it a pain to achieve the best possible sharpness. So, what you can do is to either use a strong flashlight or the lights of your vehicle (if you have one available of course) to light up an object at a sufficient distance and let your camera autofocus on that object. Then turn focus on manual and you are ready to go! Another technique might be using live mode and trying to focus on a bright stellar object like a planet or something (Thanks Jack Ripper!).This is something that I found to be harder than the first method though.

Lens Hood or no Lens Hood? Well, I didn't really see a difference by using one in my case. If there are city-lights nearby, the sky itself will get bright, so no point on using one. Lens hood might have an effect on lights you might turn on in the immediate area. If someone knows more about it, please feel free to explain.
Intervalometer is obligatory. Some DSLR bodies come with a build in intervalometer, which might be enough. Even in that case though, shooting longer than 30seconds might require an external one. Since our goal is to capture the motion of the earth on the static sky, we will need to shoot 1 picture every 35-40seconds. Less than that will be a waste of frames.


Composition - Battery - Storage

Finding a good Composition, as in all kinds of photography-videography, is very significant. What you should do, is find something interesting οn ground level as a theme. A tree, or a building, or a distant mountain vista, or just about anything could be used as a theme in this case. Note that your background should be focused; that means it should be in some distance from your camera. Also note that you might want to artificially light up your thematic object with a very weak flashlight (see Light Painting paragraph bellow). The background (secondary theme) should be the sky of course. Having a dolly gives the whole project another dimension but, unfortunately, I don't have one at the moment, so I am unable to write about it.

The number of shots you should take is something that has already cost me some pretty good footage. Consider that 1 second of video is about 25frames and because time lapse is not an action film, you will need more or less 10 seconds of footage per scene (I shot about 5 seconds and now its like I have no footage at all), so we have 10x25=250 shots or more. Of course, 250 shots of 25sec exposure each is more or less two hours of waiting, so be ready for that.

Battery and Storage Space: Most cameras can take 250 shots with the above settings without running low. Be sure that your battery is full before you begin the whole project. You don't wanna run out of battery in the middle of the whole thing. Same goes for storage space. A raw file of the sky should be 10-20 Megabytes of data (depending on your megapixels etc), so lets say 15Mb*250 Shots is about 4Gb of data. Using cards smaller than that is a potential problem.

Test Shots are the backbone of the whole project. In this step you should take care of composition, settings, and light issues. Make sure you check every possible detail here. It is very important to devote as much time as needed during this step, in order to avoid later disappointment.


Post Processing

After a long night in an isolated place you are home and you can't wait to see the results.
Edit the RAW footage: The first thing you have to do is to Batch Process the files. I am using either Photoshop or Lightroom to batch process my files. If you don't own these programs, you can look for some freeware software such as GIMP (see GIMP Batch Processing). Now you can export the pictures to .jpg or similar format (Q: will exporting to .tiff make a difference?).

Resize: Once you are done with the basic process, you should go for image resize. Unless you go for a 4k video, you will want to convert pictures to 1080p (1920x1080 pixels). There are numerous applications that can fulfill this task. What I am using the most is a freeware application called FastStone Photo Resizer. This is a simple, user-friendly and above all fast application. With this application you can put your pictures in line, in case something is wrong with file naming (batch rename).

Creating the video: When it’s time to finalize my video, I use Adobe After Effects. After Effects can import a .jpg sequence and handle it as video footage. This is very convenient for time lapse videos (and more). Processing the video with After Effects can get really creative. The other day I used the Time Wrap effect on some footage with some pretty sweet results (Check the video below). Video editing is an art that has to be mastered from step one, so most photographers might stick to the basics. Again, you can of course find freeware applications, such as Virtual Dub, which will do the job for you (Check Tutorial).



Other Ideas

I would like to try some kind of bracketing at some point. The idea behind this is that you can support your theme, or your background-sky-theme with some extra lighting.
Lightpainting, as already mentioned above, can work really well with your main theme. What you have to take care of in lightpainting sessions is the color temperature of the light source (usually a flashlight), the stability of the light source and the distance of your main theme (in combination with the power of the light source). Take care not to ruin your long exposure pictures with intense lighting in parts of the image. Also, consider that you will need this light source to be on for a long period of time, so you might run under a power issue.


Problems

The other day I shot this footage on full manual settings, but still, it seems that there was some kind of problem with metering. The video suffers from great flickering. I have no clue what the root of the problem is, and I would like to know what went so wrong.


You can fix flicker in post processing with some great apps like LRTimelapse. I will be posting about it in the future.

Epilogue: It might take some tries before you are able to achieve a fair result in timelapsing, so do some test shots before you go for something big. Unfortunately, in my case, I’ve lost great footage because of newbie mistakes.

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Tue Aug 23, 2011 3:38 pm
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
A couple of ideas on the flicker. Did you cover the view finder? Light from behind the camera can affect the meter. It looks like there might be some flickering light source. Hard to tell, but I see some orange light that seems to get more and less intense and in conjunction with the flicker. I can't tell if that's a result of the flicker or the light source is causing it. Finally, I shot a short test time lapse of my son watching TV and I had everything locked except the ISO. the flicker from the TV screen on the wall behind him, even though it didn't seem like much, was causing the ISO to change back and forth and caused some flicker. Did you have everything locked down?

If you can get that to work, it is a neat shot. The beach and campfire is a neat idea too.


Tue Aug 23, 2011 7:05 pm
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
flyfishnevada wrote:
A couple of ideas on the flicker. Did you cover the view finder? Light from behind the camera can affect the meter. It looks like there might be some flickering light source. Hard to tell, but I see some orange light that seems to get more and less intense and in conjunction with the flicker. I can't tell if that's a result of the flicker or the light source is causing it. Finally, I shot a short test time lapse of my son watching TV and I had everything locked except the ISO. the flicker from the TV screen on the wall behind him, even though it didn't seem like much, was causing the ISO to change back and forth and caused some flicker. Did you have everything locked down?

If you can get that to work, it is a neat shot. The beach and campfire is a neat idea too.


Well, it was night 14th of August, that means that i had almost full moon, also, the red light you can see is a campfire.Do you think this campfire could cause the sky to flickr in such cold colour?I had everything locked yes, including ISO.Flicker from the TV might be something else.TV goes bright and dark prety often, in my case i had steady light (from sky).

No i didn't covered the viewfinder, but i was not mettering at all since i was shooting full manual.Well the worst, silly mistake of this footage is the format i shot it.I don't think its usabe now :(

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Wed Aug 24, 2011 1:03 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
Well, I'm as new to this as you, so that's the extent of my advice. I'm not sure if the flicker from the fire would cause the exposure to change with everything locked down or not. Hopefully someone more knowledgeable will happen by and chime in.


Wed Aug 24, 2011 10:16 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
The flicker doesn't look normal. It looks like there are halos around the trees, changing with the flicker. That would be a processing artifact. What are you doing to the photos in post? Flipping through the original photos, do they change in brightness like you see in the video?

BTW, if you're in full manual you're not allowing the camera to change any settings, so it shouldn't matter what the meter reads.
(Edit: Sorry, I see now that I just repeated what you had already stated yourself... :oops:)

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Thu Aug 25, 2011 2:28 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
flyvholm wrote:
The flicker doesn't look normal. It looks like there are halos around the trees, changing with the flicker. That would be a processing artifact. What are you doing to the photos in post? Flipping through the original photos, do they change in brightness like you see in the video?

BTW, if you're in full manual you're not allowing the camera to change any settings, so it shouldn't matter what the meter reads.



Well files are not processed at all and was shoted in full Manual mode.Files was Jpg.I might upload the sequence when i go hope to let you check in depth if you want.

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Thu Aug 25, 2011 5:16 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
It's taken using your D7000? Is ADL (Active D-Lighting) on? I've always had that off because of the potential problems for timelapse though I never tested if or how much of a problem it would be. Potentially that could be what's screwing up your footage as that basically is post processing of frames individually. If that's the case your example makes a very good illustration of this and is not entirely wasted. ;-)

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Thu Aug 25, 2011 5:53 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
Nope.ADL was off i guess, because before this failed attempt i had another attempt and it was just fine.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v207/ ... K_7045.jpg


The campfire was couple of meters away (non static lighting) and everything was fine flickerwise.

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Thu Aug 25, 2011 8:15 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
Now that is strange. I'd be more than happy to take a look at the sequence to try to figure out what's happening if you are willing to upload it to somewhere. A few frames from the non-flickering TL just before it might help too. Some sort of processing must be going on to produce these artifacts. You just imported the sequence to After Effects and compiled as-is (except resize)?

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Thu Aug 25, 2011 7:09 pm
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
flyvholm wrote:
Now that is strange. I'd be more than happy to take a look at the sequence to try to figure out what's happening if you are willing to upload it to somewhere. A few frames from the non-flickering TL just before it might help too. Some sort of processing must be going on to produce these artifacts. You just imported the sequence to After Effects and compiled as-is (except resize)?


Yes.What came up onto my thinking, is that some leafs-branches from some trees between the camera and the moon, was interfering every now and then, creating unstable lighting conditions.Long exposures might be affected by such chanses i guess.I will upload these later on if i find enough time.

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Fri Aug 26, 2011 12:58 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
Here it is:


Pictures are just resized.

Code:
https://rapidshare.com/files/980921344/CampSiteFlickeringProblem.rar

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Fri Aug 26, 2011 3:06 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
Excellent, thank you. From EXIF:

Active D-Lighting: Extra High

You have the sinner there. The images from your first sequence do actually show some non-uniform flickering, it just isn't nearly as bad as in the second case because the light is different. Specifically, the sky is brighter so ADL doesn't apply as much correction.

As a side note, I see that you stopped the lens down for these shots, probably for greater DOF. That usually introduces some flicker too, though nothing compared to what ADL did to these sequences. I'm afraid there is no way you can fix your ADL flicker here whereas there is a fair chance that "normal" aperture flicker can be eliminated (or at least significantly reduced) in post.

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Fri Aug 26, 2011 3:50 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
Ah!What app you used to see this info at EXIF.So now we know what went so terribly wrong.Stoping down was for better lens performance, since my lenses are performing the max at F5.6 (18mm).

Its ok.It was not good footage anyways since the composition was .. bad to unacceptable.Thanks for sharing!

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Fri Aug 26, 2011 4:05 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
I used Exiftool to extract the exif info. It's command line, but quite thorough.
(Edit: You can find a nice GUI for Exiftool here: http://u88.n24.queensu.ca/~bogdan/)

As another side note you might actually like your photos better without ADL - it corresponds to doing shadow/highlights in post, and in post you'll have much better control. Look here:
http://www.nikonusa.com/Learn-And-Explo ... hting.html
Looking at the example on that page, I vastly prefer the more vibrant colors you get without ADL.

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Fri Aug 26, 2011 4:13 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
Well, i was shooting on a very high dynamic landscape, thus i enabled it, i assume.Fixing it in post processing of course might be better, with more advanced algorithms etc, but sometimes, for processing time shake i use some camera Settings, mostly ADL.Of course shooting timelapse with ADL is a mistake, as i painfully found this out.

flyvholm, really, i watched your videos on vimeo, and i see that you have a lot of videos, comparing flickering betwin different cameras and different settings.Whats the source of flickering in these occasions?

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Fri Aug 26, 2011 4:47 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
I made those videos back in the day when some people seemed to think that all flicker was aperture flicker, caused by the lens diaphragm not closing to the same position for every shot. Here is an overview over sources of flicker and their severity:

1) Exposure stepping when using automatic settings. Canon DSLRs adjust exposure in 1/8EV steps resulting in quite visible stepping. For Nikons the actual step size is unknown because they don't write accurate data to EXIF, but it's big enough to produce significant flicker like for Canons. This type of flicker can sometimes be fixed in post, sometimes not quite. Other brands (compacts or DSLR) also produce significant flicker on automatic settings with one very notable exception. Canon compact cameras adjust both aperture and shutter speed in 1/32EV steps which is small enough to produce little or no flicker (can be fixed in post if any).

2) Aperture flicker. On Canons this is much less than above mentioned exposure stepping and can almost always be fixed in post. Strangely, on Nikons aperture flicker appears significantly worse and can be difficult to fix in post. To make things worse, on Nikons there is no way to lock down the diaphragm whereas Canon users can use the lens twist trick to eliminate aperture flicker. Only way to avoid aperture flicker on Nikons is to shoot wide open (which may not be possible in daylight) or use a lens with manual aperture control.

3) Shutter flicker. Like the lens diaphragm, the shutter is a mechanical device and causes a small uncertainty to be associated with the exposure time. If you use "normal" exposure times this uncertainty is insignificant and you won't see any flicker. But for very short exposures (say, < 1/1000 sec) it becomes significant and can cause flicker. If you push your camera to its max shutter speed the flicker may become bad enough that it can be difficult to fix in post.

So what kind of flicker you get depends on your camera and settings. As you've just experienced yourself, flicker can also be introduced by doing image processing on frames individually, be it in-camera or in post.

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Fri Aug 26, 2011 5:54 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
Thanks for sharing these great info.All these problems, makes me sad.I mean i invested a great amount of money to some serius gear about photography, and all these problems (along with some other) makes me feel bad about that investment.So is there any way to counter these problems in daylight and nightsky timelapse sequences?Any easy way to batch process flickered images?

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Fri Aug 26, 2011 1:04 pm
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
Well, what's really sad about it is that all our flicker issues could be fairly easy to solve in the camera firmware by allowing three things: Smaller steps of exposure adjustments, locking the diaphragm in place between exposures, using electronic shutter. All of that is possible. Electronic shutter does involve some artifacts for stills/video, but for timelapse there would be no problem - in addition, we wouldn't be wearing out the physical shutters, a significant benefit. Add a flexible in-camera intervalometer to that wishlist (Canons have none, some Nikon models do but it could be better). Unfortunately, that these things are possible and maybe even relatively easy to implement doesn't mean that we will see them any time soon. Manufacturers will roll out improvements only as they see it fit in order to maximize profit. That's business. Perhaps if we are lucky they will consider timelapse as their next new selling feature now that video capabilities have improved sufficiently to satisfy most needs. But if they do, improvements can be expected to come gradually and slowly as they did for video. We'll see.

As a Nikon shooter, the only sure way to avoid flicker is: Fully manual settings, lens wide open (or manual lens, M42 mounts and lenses are cheap and could be excellent investments for timelapse). With lens stopped down you are going to see some flicker, with automatic settings even more (if using automatic settings you should also make sure not to use spot metering which you might do for some photography). In both cases it may not be possible to fix the flicker entirely in post, but if not it can at least be reduced significantly. Possible tools:
1) GBDeflicker. Efficient, few artifacts, now available as plugin for After Effects (Mac/Win) or as standalone (Win only). RAW or JPG.
2) VirtualDub + Graft or MSU deflicker filter. Free but Win only. Occasionally more efficient than GBDeflicker, but also can produce significant artifacts (loss of contrast in case of MSU, ghosting in case of Graft). JPG only.
3) LRTimelapse. Free, Win/Mac. Can work with Lightroom, but Lightroom is not required. Have not used this, but suspect it's less efficient than above solutions, though with few artifacts. Might be used in combination with one of the above to fix stubborn flicker. RAW or JPG, and it has a few tricks up its sleeve for RAW editing.
4) Photoshop deflicker scripts. Free, Win/Mac, JPG or TIF. Haven't used this either, but expect it to perform similarly to LRTimelapse.
Other deflicker methods/software do exist, but they are either quite expensive, cumbersome or inefficient.

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Fri Aug 26, 2011 9:11 pm
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
Well i don't think timelapse will become very popular anytime.It just takes too much effort for the average photographer to get enough good shots, and then batch edit, and then video edit etc.Maybe we could see some custom firmware though, but its risky.

About deflicker, LRTimelapse seems to me pretty serious attempt and i think i will stick with it for now.

Thanks for sharing all the info!

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My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Sun Aug 28, 2011 11:42 pm
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
wow i totally missed this, great thread. Subscribing

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Fri Sep 30, 2011 10:02 am
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Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse
hehe thanks Jack.Any tip or fix for any mistake is always more than wellcome.

_________________
My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Fri Sep 30, 2011 10:07 am
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 8:47 am
Posts: 9
Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse Tutorial
Nikon has a NEF codec but only for 32 bit.

http://nikonimglib.com/nefcodec/

Here is one for 64 bit.

http://mansurovs.com/free-nikon-raw-nef-codec-for-64-bit-vista-or-windows-7

BTW thanks for the tutorial. My camera is set up in the back yard turned to the sky as I write this. Keeping my fingers crossed I get something good. :-)


Mon Oct 10, 2011 7:38 pm
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Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2011 9:45 am
Posts: 116
Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse Tutorial
Waiting for your Results Marlene!Thanks for the codecs!

Btw, i just updated the post with the 650 rule.This rule is all about pill shaped stars and how long you have to shoot in order to avoid this effect.

_________________
My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Tue Oct 11, 2011 10:23 am
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 8:47 am
Posts: 9
Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse Tutorial
Storm with high wind blew in so had to rescue the Nikon.

The D300 needs a sensor cleaning badly. I e-mailed camera store about 3 1/2 hrs. away if they would clean it. They said " Yes .... We like to do it as a way of showing people how they can do it. It's scary the first time but once you see it done it's not bad at all. Come on in and one of us will give you a hand." Also e-mailed a store 2 1/2 hrs. away and they didn't reply so I phoned them. Their reply "We'll show you how but we aren't going to be liable". Guess I drive the 3 1/2 hrs. one-way tomorrow. Both places are the same chain - Don's Photo and I do like the them.


Tue Oct 18, 2011 8:42 pm
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Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2011 9:45 am
Posts: 116
Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse Tutorial
There are plenty of online tutorials on how to clean your camera lens, sencor, mirror etc, though most of them are not telling the whole story or tell the story wrong.Its better for you to follow this method for the first time yeah.

_________________
My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Tue Oct 18, 2011 11:51 pm
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 8:47 am
Posts: 9
Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse Tutorial
I am dancing a jig and as happy as can be. Cleaned sensor and now know how to do it myself. Had lunch with DIL. Well worth 6 hours of driving. Hoping for clouds tomorrow to do some time-lapse and clear skies at night to do astro. :-)


Wed Oct 19, 2011 10:03 pm
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Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2011 9:45 am
Posts: 116
Post Re: Nighsky Timelapse Tutorial
Unfortunately, i see that this thread is being lost in the abyss of the forum,as well as i don't really get any feedback from any other user; thus i am considering to stop updating it here.I will keep it updated on my personal blog for sure though.

_________________
My 500px : http://500px.com/TheoKondak
My gear : Nikon D7000 - Tokina 10-17 Fisheye - Nikkor 18-70mm - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 G - Sigma 150mm f2.8 Micro
Some threads you might wanna check:
Nightsky Timelapse Tutorial.
Camera Settings for Astrophotography.


Sun Nov 27, 2011 3:14 pm
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